Scholar Lunch

Come to L203 at noon. If you’re one of the first to arrive, you can have free pizza. The meal’s entertainment consists of five minute talks by representatives from majors and minors across campus. Speakers will take a single idea they learned from their major or minor coursework, explain it, explain why it’s useful or beautiful, and explain why they personally love it. Scheduled speakers:

  • Cameron Binaley, History
  • Grayson Rose Carmack, Psychology
  • Tanner Dean, English
  • Miranda Gutierrez, Spanish
  • Bradley Keller, Communication
  • Joshua McCluskey, Biology

L203

Noon – 1 PM

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Ashley Alldridge, Katia Burke, Daniel Gerlach, & Alex Nyman

Instant Pot Smart WIFI: Sectioned Edition 

This presentation includes a new product expo booth feauturing a prototype of the Instant Pot Smart WIFI: Sectioned Edition, a pressure cooker designed to bring convenience to your countertop. Through the presentation of this product and the highlighting of its new features, capabilites and compatibility with existing technological applications, our new cookware differentiates itself from the other competitors in the market. We will be discussing its practical applications and the marketing strategies that we will employ. This product will add value to any home, at any time.   

MKTG 330, Marketing 

Tim Veach 

SPS 100 

10 AM – Noon 

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Noel Balderston & Anna Cardwell

Healthy habits and hobbies  

Our presentation is on how physical activity and nutrition affects an elementary students behavior in the classroom.  We examined the lack of both physical activity and nutrition in a students life and how that affects their behavior when in school. We found that six out of ten students in grades K-8 come to school hungry because they are not getting enough to eat or anything to eat at home. We also found that 1 in 3 elementary aged students are over weight due to a lack of physical activity and eating habits. Both over weight and underweight kids in America may be deemed as malnourished. A lack of proper food intake is known as malnourishment and it does not imply there is a lack of food, but it signifies a lack of nutrients. Malnutrition can result in long term neural issues in the brain which can impact a child’s emotional response, reactions to stress, learning disabilities, and other medical complications. Also, most students rely on food provided by the school during their school day, and if the school only provides lunch, then that is the only meal they are eating most days. The benefits of physical fitness go beyond health and wellness of the body. Besides strengthening the cardiovascular and muscular systems and lowering the risk of many diseases, research suggests that physical activity also positively impacts the brain and improves mood and attention in students. Also, providing daily aerobic activities to children can help to reduce symptoms of ADHD such as moodiness and inattentiveness. Research shows that even short bursts of movement deliver big benefits for brain health and academic performance, relative to sitting quietly and preventing unwanted behaviors. 

Our project is important because healthy students perform better. Poor nutrition and inadequate physical activity can affect not only academic achievement, but also other factors such as absenteeism, classroom behavior, ability to concentrate, self-esteem, cognitive performance, and test scores. To support positive outcomes for both health AND learning, it’s important that educators incorporate movement into their classroom routine. 

EDUC 330, Child Development 

Brian Kaelin 

L203, poster #2 

10 AM – Noon 

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Kinkade Barreiro

Bushnell History Symposium: Stagnation of Minority Representation in Media 

In the last two centuries, the status of minorities in the United States has improved dramatically. A survey of events where different racial groups have clashed during the struggle to improve the lives of minorities over the last century specifically shows that the way minority groups are perceived by the majority often contains dramatic biases. This survey attempts to show that the media’s representation of these events and the responses by majority populations to the events has not evolved with the urgency that other elements of American culture have. 

HIST 499, Capstone 

Melisa Ortiz Berry 

P103 

10 – 11 AM 

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Liam Bedford, Amy Burbee, Zach Flanders , Jennifer Herrera, & Gunnar Lassen

Epic Provisions – PNW Elk 

The new Pacific Northwest (PNW) line of Epic bar introduces it’s first organic, nature-inspired, Elk bar line that aligns with the Whole Animal Project.  This new flavor option fits perfectly with the “Live Wild, Eat Free” slogan and will specifically emphasize the bountiful PNW offerings.  Elk provides healthy protein options that are preservative, gluten-free, without MSG and sugar and honors our ancestor’s diets that continue to respect nature and clean eating.    

MKTG 330, Marketing 

Tim Veach 

SPS 100 

10 AM – Noon 

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Cameron Binaley, Toby Carter, Nate Graham, Caleb Plummer & Maddie Thompson

Love Changes Everything 

The way God loves is set apart from any other kind of love, and this is important to understand the love God has for us and how this transforms lives. In this word study, we will be analyzing the different words for “love” in the Greek language. We will be seeking to define and look at the individual usage of the words ερως, ἄστοργος, φιλέω, and ἀγάπη. Using multiple different Greek dictionaries as well as examples from the Bible (NASB), we are able to make conclusions about the meaning of the words. Specifically, we will examine and discuss the difference between ἀγάπη and φιλέω, the two most common words for love in the scriptures. By the context in which words are used, we are able to understand what they mean, and their significance. It’s important to understand the different meanings because the word itself and the action of love can be expressed in a multitude of different ways. 

GRK 301, Elementary Greek 

Melisa Ortiz Berry 

P103 

11 AM – Noon 

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Mary Grace Blaser, Katia Burke & Shivonne Robinson

Can people recognize organizational status through vocal qualities alone? 

When outsiders of an organization witness two people within the organization having an interaction, the outsider most likely will guess their status within the organization through the nonverbals that they observe including vocal qualities, clothing, visible signs of age, and hair color. It is a question of interest which of these channels provides the most reliable cues. This study focused on the vocal qualities in interactions and asked if people can accurately guess relative organizational status from a vocal recording alone and which vocal qualities convey an impression of authority. We hypothesized that lower frequency correlates to dominance, regardless of male or female, and that rate of speech will have a weak relationship to dominance. To test this hypothesis, we collected sound clips of colleagues and subordinates having a conversation. Results showed that the participants were very inaccurate in recognizing when one person worked for the other. They were, however, very accurate in recognizing when people were colleagues.  

COMM 430, Nonverbal Communication 

Doyle Srader 

L203, poster #15 

10 AM – Noon 

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Teresa Branson & Savanna Breiholz

The Pros and Cons of Incentives in an Elementary Classroom 

This poster presentation addresses the pros and cons of incentives in an elementary school classroom. The pros that are being considered include appropriate behavior, increased motivation, joyful students, boosted self-esteem, completed homework, and improved results. The cons that are being examined include addiction, devaluation, race against the clock, control and manipulate, increased pressure, and bribes. The examples that will be shared are a good behavior chart, a class store, coupons, and points.   

EDUC 330, Child Development 

Brian Kaelin 

L203, poster #3 

10 AM – Noon 

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Hannah Bucher, Kelsie Hellwege, Brad Keller, Logan Oakerman & Ryann Reeves

Starbucks Buff Blend 

Our project consists of a booth presenting at a new product expo, introducing the Starbucks Buff Blend. This is based on evidence that this product will be successful in its target market. Moreover, our booth will include a digital presentation of how our product will succeed and benefit the market. We will also have an array of sample product prototypes for our booth visitors to test out.   

MKTG 330, Marketing 

Tim Veach 

SPS 100 

10 AM – Noon 

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Grayson Rose Carmack

Studying Abroad in South Korea 

In this presentation, Grayson Carmack will discuss what he learned in South Korea during the summer of 2019 while studying abroad. Through his experiences in teaching English to Korean college students, learning from Korean culture in his own classes, and exploring the country, he was significantly affected. This trip changed how he now approaches and lives within American culture, ranging from simple fashion choices to an entire worldview. He was immersed in such a culturally profound environment that his academic, professional, and social skills have been enriched. Above all, the conscientiousness and kindness he experienced and developed through interacting with another culture have spread to and impacted many other areas of his life. Mr. Carmack will also be sharing photos from his trip.

GLST 295, Study Abroad 

Lauren Riley 

SPS 100 

2:30 – 3 PM 

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Grayson Rose Carmack

Gender Roles in Adults with Asperger’s Syndrome/High-Functioning Autism 

The researcher will present an original exploratory qualitative study investigating the intersection of adults with Asperger’s Syndrome/high-functioning autism and gender identity. The researcher gathered qualitative data through the use of interviews and related measures. Participants included four adults, ranging from young adult to middle-aged, with three males and one female. Further, the researcher administered the Autism Quotient (Baron-Cohen, 2001), interviews in two individual sessions, demographic survey, and a graphic measure designed by the researcher for the purpose of assessing internal sense of conformity to gender roles along the gender continuum. The researcher found that the participants expressed a history of negative experiences relating to gender roles, especially when they found they could not conform to those roles adequately. Also, upon being made aware of this difficulty, they made committed efforts to fit in with their peers, especially in adolescence. As they matured, they abandoned these efforts and prioritized their natural inclinations and values over pressure to conform to societal gender roles. Based on study findings, the researcher concluded that people with Asperger’s Syndrome/high-functioning autism may experience greater difficulty navigating binary societal gender roles in comparison to their neurotypical peers. Future directions will also be discussed, including the need for a replication of the present study focused on transgender adults with Asperger’s Syndrome/high-functioning autism. 

PSY 490/499, Research Practicum & Capstone 

Mary Ann Winter-Messiers 

Banquet Room 

10 – 11 AM 

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Blake Carpenter & Jestyna Mosttler

The Effects of Trauma on Children 

Trauma is something that seems to affect the majority of the world’s population at least once in their lives. In some cases, this can mean it takes place during a child’s fundamental learning years. Our assignment will begin with looking at how exactly Childhood Trauma is defined, as well as key questions on what scenarios can cause this. It will then be followed by signs and symptoms an educator can look for that point to this affecting their student’s lives. It will end with how educators can take Childhood Trauma into account and help their students exposed to this within the classroom environment. 

EDUC 330, Child Development 

Brian Kaelin 

L203, poster #4 

10 AM – Noon 

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Shawn Carson, Malik Corey & Makenna Hadaller

Smart Nutrition   

Our product is a cutting board, but this is not an ordinary wooden or plastic cutting board from the store that will only last a few months. This cutting board is able to protect the knife from going dull longer. Our cutting board will help everyone from athletes, chefs, those who want to eat healthy and everyday people. With our cutting board Smart Nutrition, you can cut, weight and dispense accurate portions. This kitchen must-have will help save time, improve cooking skills and help promote healthy eating. Smart Nutrition has multiple surfaces to prevent cross-contamination. The scale can measure in grams, kilograms, ounces, pounds, and milliliters. 

MKTG 330, Marketing 

Tim Veach 

SPS 100 

10 AM – Noon 

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Daniel Carter, Ethan Crofts, Gage Garcia, Shawn Johnson & Ray Thomas

Cabela’s ATLAS app 

We are developing a prototype app that will be a very resourceful tool for hunters and outdoorsman and present it with a prototype of the app and a powerpoint   

MKTG 330, Marketing 

Tim Veach 

SPS 100 

10 AM – Noon

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Alaina Cloer & Mikayla Rodriguez

Affects of Hunger on Students Success 

Food insecurity has a negative impact on students success, while food security has a positive impact on student success. As teachers we can help students with food insecurities by having opportunities for the students to eat while at school. 

EDUC 330, Child Development 

Brian Kaelin 

L203, poster #5 

10 AM – Noon 

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Georgia Cook & Amelia Geist

What are the benefits of having a classroom pet in an early elementary classroom? 

The research question posed was: “What are the benefits of having a classroom pet in an early elementary classroom?” According to our findings, having a classroom pet makes students feel more at ease, reduces stress, encourages healthy development of caring and empathetic relationships, and increases compassion. In regards to other areas of development, having a classroom pet increases student self-efficacy, increases responsibility, promotes healthy social interactions, enhances self-esteem and feelings of self-worth, and reduces egocentrism. Some challenges to having a classroom pet include student allergies, taking care of the pet on weekends and holidays, licensing regulations, school policies, and health and safety liabilities. In connection to theories of education and child development, having classroom pets encourages industry rather than inferiority according to Erikson’s Theory of Psychosocial Development. In Erikson’s theory, there are eight different crises, and the developmental crisis that affects early elementary aged students is known as Industry vs. Inferiority. The crisis of Industry vs. Inferiority involves whether a student has confidence in their abilities or if they feel incompetent and doubtful. Having a classroom pet allows students to demonstrate their ability to take care of something else and to be responsible, thus encouraging them to identify with the industry side of the crisis. 

EDUC 330, Child Development 

Brian Kaelin 

L203, poster #6 

10 AM – Noon 

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Stacy Cook & Skyler Tidwell

What are the homelessness impacts of students attendance and how can we help? 

Our research is going to answer what are the homelessness impacts of students attendance and how can we help. Homelessness is defined by The McKinney-Vento Act as children and youth who lack a fixed, regular and adequate nighttime residence. Wharton University of Pennsylvania defines social impact as an organizations actions that have on the wellbeing of the community. Research from Allison Howland’s article: Exploring socio-demographics, mobility, and living arrangement as risk factors for academic performance among children experiencing homelessness showing homeless students are more likely to be held back from grade to grade, be chronically absent, fail courses, have more disciplinary issues, and drop out of high school than their non-homeless peers. What we can do as educators include targeted interventions, increased interactions with family members, collaboration with supportive district, community-based program, ensuring emotional safety of students, and create support, structure and opportunity. Another avenue of help is a district wide homelessness liaison. We can connect the effected youth and family with this liaison who can connect them to a variety of programs such as housing, health care and shelters. To ensure the attendance of these youth in crisis, we can learn about the homeless student stability program implemented in Washington for a preventative measure and can also teach value to oneself and take the focus off the economic culture.  

EDUC 330, Child Development 

Brian Kaelin 

L203, poster #9 

10 AM – Noon

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Avery Daniels

The Importance and Potential Benefits of Nanotechnology: Nanomedicine 

This presentation is about the importance and potential benefits of nanotechnology used in medicine: Nanomedicine. Technology has been a vast growing field. But we always think of the technology that is in our hands or sitting in front of our face. Nanotechnology is a technology that we can put to the use of medicine. It can be used to prevent disease, new drug delivery, and may even extend our life span. It can also be used to treat cancer tumors by having Nanoparticles injected into our body, destroying only the tumor. Knowing about the benefits of Nanomedicine can open your mind about new ideas of medicine.   

BIOL 499, Capstone 

Paul Allee 

P114 

2:30 – 3 PM 

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Grace Dawson

Hunger  

In my research, I have found a correlation between malnutrition and the cognitive development of young children. Hunger is a major problem in the US, and as I work in my practicum, I am witnessing it first-hand. As a future teacher, this is something that will affect how I approach my students and how I teach them. To introduce my topic, I have included some recent facts and statistics about hunger within the state of Oregon as well as the nation. Next, I will discuss both the internal and external outcomes of hunger in the classroom, such as student performance and behavior. The bulk of my information will be focusing on the effects that malnutrition has on the brain – how the brain functions and looks when it is malnourished compared to how it looks and functions normally. I plan on ending my presentation with a few solutions that teachers can do to help solve the issue of hunger within the classroom.   

EDUC 330, Child Development 

Brian Kaelin 

L203, poster #10 

10 AM – Noon 

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Tanner Dean

There is no Guru, there is no Mountain:  Beyond the “Ideal Other” and “Utopia” in To the Lighthouse and The Road 

People often flock to “gurus”, or throw themselves into movements, that seem to offer an answer to life’s antagonisms and sufferings. In To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf and The Road by Cormac McCarthy there is a subversion that is being done to free the reader from the cycle that is moving from a guru, or movement, to another, in an intellectual sense. People tend to throw themselves to self-help book after self-help book in hope of an answer, but in these novels there is a way to escape the ferry wheel that is certainty and embrace the depth and density of life amidst our struggle. In To the Lighthouse a psychanalytic framework is helpful for braking free from the “ideal other”, or guru. The Road uses imagery of stillness, relationality, and embodiment to show that a utopia cannot ever be possible, yet we should continue into the gray unknown. 

ENG 499, Capstone 

James Watson 

SPS 100 

1 – 1:30 PM 

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Natalie Downes & Molly Holmberg

What are the positive and negative effects of a token economy? 

Our research question is; What are the positive and negative effects of a token economy? A token economy is a system of contingency management based on the systematic reinforcement of target behavior. The reinforcers are symbols or tokens that can be exchanged for other reinforcers. A token economy is a beneficial tool used in many elementary classrooms due to its high success rate in promoting voluntary good behavior from students. The benefits heavily outweigh the negative attributes of using a token economy in the classroom. This is not to say that there are not negative components. In some cases, using a token economy can discourage a student if they do not receive a reward every time they perform a desired behavior. While it is true that a token economy might encourage students to follow directions solely for their own personal gain, performing the desired behavior teaches the student that they can follow directions. It also allows the teacher to set the standard that the student is capable of behaving. A token economy also allows the teacher to give students instant feedback regarding their behavior, as well as strengthen target behaviors that the teacher deems necessary for their classroom. Token economies are a positive tool when used correctly, and have the power to transform the behaviors that students perform drastically and can overall help them learn appropriate behavior.   

EDUC 330, Child Development 

Brian Kaelin 

L203, poster #11 

10 AM – Noon 

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Hannah Eddens

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons  and human biological effects 

Pollution has created significant impacts in human life in the past. It has devastated life greatly in all aspects. Pollutant materials are found across the globe in the water we drink, the air we breath, and land we walk on. One of the biggest concerns within the topic of pollution discusses the harmful particles we are constantly exposed to through the air we breath and the everyday products we use. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are derivatives of partial combustion of fossil fuels, biomass and overheating of organic material.[8] Exposure to this particulate matter has been researched and linked to the synthesis of DNA adducts and tumorigenesis. There are a number of pathways that operate the metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons,   

  • formation of dihydrodiol epoxides requiring 2 CYP-catalyzed oxidations and epoxide hydrolase 
  • formation of phenols via radical cations by 1-electron oxidation  
  • formation of o-quinones via catechols by involvement of aldo-keto reductases with formation of ROS 

BIOL 499, Capstone 

Paul Allee 

P114 

1 – 1:30 PM 

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Daniel Gerlach

“The Subtle Eccentric” Public Relations Application in the Field 

Upon learning how to manage crises, implement social research and corporate ethics, build the reputations of clients and organizations, understand global social media trends, and develop a company’s mission, goals, and strategic communication plans, I got to apply my knowledge directly in the field to my brother’s clothing design company, The Subtle Eccentric. This process led to some groundbreaking results and helped the new enterprise start off on the right foot.   

COMM 310, Foundations of Public Relations 

Kelsay Rychener 

L203, poster #7 

10 AM – Noon 

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Daniel Gerlach

Competitive versus. Collaborative Listening 

In order to discover which is more powerful, speaking or listening, Daniel Gerlach and Doyle Srader are implimenting two studies to determine people’s perceptions of listening and speaking and determine in debate which is the more strategic behavior, attempting to counteract the general belief that listening is weaker than speaking and that listening can be considered as competitive just as much as it can be collaborative.   

COMM 325, Argumentation and Debate 

Doyle Srader 

L203, poster #8 

10 AM – Noon 

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Kylie Hecker

How does water support student cognitive function? 

Water is essential to all beings and greatly affects how the human brain functions, mostly in children. Multiple studies show that water impacts a students cognitive function particularly in the classroom. A lack of water hinders there ability to pay attention, and to properly absorb information. Students are not drinking water because they often fear the safety of the water, water isn’t accessibly offered in their schools, or often time they prefer other beverages like soft drinks . So how do we encourage them to drink water? Make it more easily accessible, make it fun by adding fruit, and make an emphasis on it are a simple few options out of many. 

EDUC 330, Child Development 

Brian Kaelin 

L203, poster #12 

10 AM – Noon 

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Julian Hernandez, Jose Magana, Jovany Sanchez & Nicolas Schapochnik

Nike Smart Soccer Ball 

In the world of sports, technology is building better athletes, and keeping them safer on the field. With that in mind, we came up with the idea for an innovative product for Nike, a smart soccer ball that allows players to take their game to the next level. 

The Nike SS ball is a smart soccer ball that a sensor-packed inside that connects with an iOS or android app via Bluetooth and sends your game data to your device. The application presents an immense amount of data like speed, RPM, and impact zone on the ball. Not only does the Nike SS Ball allow users to easily identify strengths and weakness of their kicks it also provides detailed coaching instructions to help improve a shot’s bend or knuckle. The app has tutorials to help beginners and includes progress recording as a regular fitness service. 

It even turns training into a mission mini-game, as if the kicks had to go through a virtual wall, for example, making you kick a specific height to improve placement. After using a full charge, which can last up to two a thousand kicks, the ball can be powered by a wireless charger. In addition to free kicks, this product is suitable for penalty kicks, long-range passes, corner kicks and goal shots. 

MKTG 330, Marketing 

Tim Veach 

SPS 100 

10 AM – Noon 

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Covita Rachelle Hughes

Post Sexual Assault Outcomes in Females 

Sexual assault is one of the most complex issues in our society.  It is one of the most injurious crimes that perpetrators can inflict on other individuals.  Females are among the most vulnerable.  Female survivors of sexual assault of any age may experience long-term adverse effects later in life.  Thus, this presentation reviews four research trends in the long-term negative outcomes of sexual assault. First, female victims of sexual assault experience shame and low self-esteem. Second, there is a high risk for revictimization for female survivors of sexual assault.  Third, female victims experience emotional and psychological challenges. Lastly, female survivors of sexual assault are at risk for mental illnesses such as anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and suicidal ideation.  Researchers have reported that once a female has experienced sexual assault, her risk of experiencing further sexual victimization is significantly elevated. Victims may experience high levels of shame and guilt and feel that they are to blame for the sexual assault and their inability to escape from their perpetrators.  Future directions will also be discussed, including the need for research focused on strategies for improving accurate societal understanding of sexual assault and its long-term effects.     

PSY 499, Capstone 

Mary Ann Winter-Messiers 

Banquet Room 

11 – 11:30 AM 

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Kevin Kaelin

Alternative Power Sources: Electrifying Commercial Aircraft 

In a world with an ever-increasing demand for transportation, solutions are needed to limit the amount of pollution generated by vehicles.  One solution for limiting emissions from vehicles is to make them electric.  This research seeks to answer this question: is an electrically powered jet engine feasible for commercial aircraft?  This project takes a standard CFM56-7B24 turbofan jet engine that powers a Boeing 737-800 plane and explores the conceptual use of electric motors to drive the fan and compressor assembly.  The overall weight of this concept is compared to the maximum operating weight of the Boeing 737-800.  The total amount of kilowatt-hours required is calculated as well as the total weight of batteries needed to satisfy the energy requirements of this concept.  Based on the findings of this research: current battery densities are too low to provide a weight-effective solution to petroleum-based jet fuel.   

MATH 499, Capstone 

Brian Carrigan 

P103 

2:30 – 3 PM 

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Elena Kazakevicius

Transforming FYS: an Analysis of Other Institutions FYS Courses  

As institutions are becoming increasingly aware of the individual concerns of incoming students, higher education intends to find a way to make the transition smoother Danitz, Suvak, Orsillo (2016). Through this, First-Year Seminar courses have been implemented within different institutions in varying ways. Analyzing the research on three institutions’ First-Year Seminar courses, one might draw on the benefits of these programs for integration in such existing courses. For example, it has been suggested by Danitz, Suvak, Orsillo (2016), that in order to create the smoothest transition possible, one must first focus on how to interact with one another appropriately and in a helpful way. In response to the literature on First-Year success courses, recommendations for future First-Year Seminar courses at Northwest Christian University will be addressed.   

FYS 101, First Year Seminar 

Falyn Edwards & Nani Skaggs 

L203, poster #1 

10 AM – Noon 

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Elena Kazakevicius

Logic and Critical Thinking: Through the Lense of Forensics 

My presentation explores Logic and Critical Thinking, specifically the latter, in relation to Forensic Psychology. Critical Thinking can be defined by two separate types of reasoning, rational and rationalized reasoning. Forensic psychologists study the ways criminals use reasoning skills to rationalize their behavior to themselves and others.  Reasoning can also take the form of “rationality,” which involves following premises to a true conclusion. Forensic psychologists do this when they create profiles for criminals, attempting to rationally understand the rationalization processes of criminals in order to create patterns that assist in stopping them from committing more crimes in the future. Through my research into forensic psychology, I expose a tension in critical thinking: reasoning skills can be used both for truth-seeking and for justifying violent and immoral behavior. 

PHL 201, Logic and Critical Thinking 

Joshua Kerr 

P103 

1:30 – 2 PM

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Brad Keller & Nick Rodriguez

Topic: NCU students get a better education than U of O students do. 

Affirmative: Brad Keller

Negative: Nick Rodriguez

The winner will be decided by audience vote, and will be crowned the 2019 NCU Debate Champion.

COMM 325, Argumentation and Debate 

Doyle Srader 

P103 

2 – 2:30 PM 

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Garrison Lyman

Battling Juvenile Delinquency  

Investigating what causes juveniles to be delinquent from poor school attendance, poor educational standards, violence in the home, violence in their social circles, peer pressure, socioeconomic factors, substance abuse, and gender bias.  I want to explore these topics as a sense to understand the current situation children are put in that can cause them to lash out and become more hostile towards others.  So, we need to look at not only the children but the parental influence as well.   If their parents are frequent offenders of the law, the children would most likely follow down that path as well.    

IDS 499, Capstone 

Brian Mills 

P103 

1 – 1:30 PM 

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Kaitlin Martin

Common Threads: A Reflection on Six Short Works 

I will be presenting a small selection of creative pieces from my writing portfolio. The six short works I have chosen are representative of the three schools I have attended and will be read in conversation with the reflective paper I have written about the wonderful – and often intense, insane, barely endurable – journey I have been on for the last ten years. I will begin with two poems that were well-received but, ultimately, not chosen for advancement in regional writing competitions through Lane Community College; I will proceed with one short story and one poem written during my time at the University of Oregon; and I will end with another short story and poem that were penned here at NCU. The pieces will, ultimately, speak for themselves. They will illustrate what it’s like to be both artist and Christian, craving both sin and freedom, torn between independence and redemption – in essence, they will expose some of the intricate threadwork that connects me to you through the one thing we all have in common: our humanity. 

ENG 499, Capstone 

James Watson 

SPS 100 

1:30 – 2 PM

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Katy Matteucci

Biodiversity Decline in the Great Barrier Reef 

This presentation reviews the biodiversity of organisms that dwell within the Great Barrier Reef, and analyzes how various human activities have been ushering a destructive wave against this complex ecosystem. As a result of the augmenting carbon levels in our atmosphere, overfishing procedures, and the addition of numerous toxic chemical substances and other pollutants, many species are being affected. As coral growth and development are inhibited, the natural homes, food sources, and breeding grounds of many aquatic creatures are being uprooted. In addition, many larger species, such as sea cucumbers, fish, and turtles, are facing draconian challenges due to overharvesting and pollution. Fortunately however, these conditions are not irremediable. By establishing a clean energy economy and imposing regulations regarding mismanaged fishing and toxic waste, the potential for the revival of this biome will again be attainable, eventually restoring the vibrancy of the Great Barrier Reef. 

Paul Allee 

P114 

10 – 10:30 AM

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Joshua McCluskey

Genetic Effect on Common Diseases 

The management and treatment of different diseases can be directly related to the origin of the disease. Diseases that have strong genetic ties can be treated in different ways than disease that have no correlation to the genetics of a person. In this review we discuss the different variations of effects of genetics on phenotypic diseases in an organism as well as discuss possible ways for treatment of these diseases. We discuss how we can prevent the spread of diseases that are not genetically tied as well as upcoming technology that allows us to correct any genetic abnormalities that can cause diseases.   

BIOL 310, Genetics 

Paul Allee 

P114 

10:30 – 11 AM 

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Joshua McCluskey

Comparing the effects of different classes of medication in the management of hypertension 

The diagnosis of hypertension is common and treatment is frequently viewed as very simple. Treating hypertension takes more than just lowering the blood pressure of an individual. There are comorbidities that affect and are affected by the treatment of hypertension: kidney disease and cardiovascular disease. In this review we discuss the different preferences of using either Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, Calcium Channel blockers, Beta Blockers, and Diuretics when managing hypertension with the use of medications. It appears that Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) inhibitors were preferential to the management of kidney disease secondary to hypertension. Calcium channel blockers were additionally found to have an advantage with many cardiovascular diseases while beta blockers were also considered for cardiovascular issues including atrial fibrillation and tachycardia specifically. Beta blockers and Diuretics had minute differences in secondary management of cardiovascular disease and kidney disease when compared. 

CHEM 415, Biochemistry 

Heike McNeil 

P114 

11:30 AM – Noon 

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