Scholar Lunch

Come to L203 at noon. If you’re one of the first to arrive, you can have free pizza. The meal’s entertainment consists of five minute talks by representatives from majors and minors across campus. Speakers will take a single idea they learned from their major or minor coursework, explain it, explain why it’s useful or beautiful, and explain why they personally love it. Scheduled speakers:
Courtney Alldridge, Business
Angela Cusano, Communication
Tessa Galindo, Spanish
Andres Martinez, Accounting
Gabrielle Morales, English
Jordan Norris, Psychology
L203
Noon – 1 PM
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Hannah Adams

What is the Impact of Trauma in the Classroom?
Trauma and stress related instances are a huge concern in the lives of children and young adults around the world. However, one aspect of trauma and stress that we tend to not think about, especially as educators, is how those two factors impact the students that we teach and interact with on a daily basis. This presentation highlights just that and focuses on the six main different types of trauma on the trauma spectrum, as well as various triggers brought on by daily classroom activities that might spark outbreaks with those affected by trauma. Additionally, a traumatic experience gets depicted in the perspective of the teacher, as well as that of the child who has experienced it, and different trauma signals and signs that could occur within the students one might be teaching are also highlighted and explained. Lastly, this presentation covers several different de-escalation strategies that could be used in a potential outburst with a traumatized student(s), A national poll that depicts how trauma has affected children and students long-term who are now adults, as well as what teachers and schools can do to be more informed about the topic of trauma and what they can do to best help their students. My hope is that by presenting this topic to the viewers, they will be able to better understand how crucial it is for future educators to be highly prepared and able to handle and care for traumatized students, as well as to gain a bit of perspective as to what life is like on a daily basis for students who have been affected by trauma and stress.
EDUC 321, Classroom Relations and Management
Brian Kaelin
L203
10 AM – Noon
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Courtney Alldridge, Jenna Christenson & Josh Goins

Business Capstone
Cost Leader with Product Lifecycle Focus. Our extraordinary products are tailored for technology-oriented customers. We provide world-class products backed by fanatical support, delivering an exceptional experience. We also drive great returns for our stakeholders, which include our customers, stockholders, management and employees.
BUS 499, Business Strategy & Policy
Dave Quirk
L204
10 AM – Noon
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Katelyn Allen & Corina Gemini

Classroom Design This presentation explores the ways in which classroom design can both positively and negatively affect classroom management. The purpose of this presentation is to help teachers and future educators alike use classroom design as an effective classroom management strategy. Our research includes seating arrangements, zones of proximity, and effective ways to organize a classroom. Our findings stem from Fred Jones’ book “Tools For Teaching” and our 16-week classroom management course here at NCU.
EDUC 321, Classroom Relations and Management
Brian Kaelin
L203
10 AM – Noon
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Michael Andrews, Joshua Chesnut, Olisaemeka Obianozie & Jacob Pitts

Baldwin Branch
Baldwin is committed to improving the quality of life and human capabilities of society through fostering innovation and conducting rigorous research.
BUS 499, Business Strategy & Policy
Dave Quirk
L204
10 AM – Noon
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Conner Borigo

Mentoring in Female Sports
This project focuses on how mentoring in middle school female basketball is desired to help said athletes to navigate the challenges of being an adolescent female athlete in a male dominated sport. I examine the problem with young women in sports by identifying the internal and external factors that could affect their mental and physical well-being. I also look into the women’s history in general and in respect to athletics. I give a biblical perspective of mentorship from Paul and Timothy’s relationship in 2 Timothy 1-4, and give a model of a successful modern mentorship. With the help of personal interviews with both a mentor and mentee in the local area, this research project will give insight on how to mentor young female basketball athletes.
CM 499, Capstone
Agametochukwu D. Iheanyi-Igwe
P103
10:30 – 11 AM
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Anna Brooks

Prevalence of Concussions in High School Football and Strategies for Prevention
Football players are at high risk of sports-related concussions (SRC), and athletes ages 15 to 19 years are most commonly affected. To preserve young athletes’ long term cognitive function and overall well-being while also prolonging their careers, prevention at the high school level is imperative. The purpose of this literature review is to assess and address prevention strategies of SRC in high school football.
In this presentation, the research of SRC prevention strategies in football will be critiqued, specifically focusing on helmet design versus neck strengthening. Improved helmet technology has not proven to be the most effective tool for preventing concussion, yet most resources are allocated in this area of research. Concussed athletes, however, have demonstrated significantly less neck strength than athletes who did not sustain a concussion. Therefore, it will be argued that implementing neck strengthening to high school football programs is a more effective concussion prevention strategy than consistent helmet upgrades.
EXSC 425, Biomechanics of Musculoskeletal Injury
Heike McNeil
P103
1 – 1:30 PM
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Antonio Campos-Perez, Tyler Farmer, Harley Gilpin & Austin Tyner

Andrews Tech. Company
Andrews is a multimillion dollar company. We manufacture sensors, which we market to other manufacturers. They put out products into the devices they sell. Out company was created when the government split a monopoly into identical competitors. Sensors are devices that observe physical conditions. For example, the average cell phone contains dozens of sensors that allow it to interpret touch, spatial orientation, and signal strength. New sensor businesses are created every day in areas as diverse as security, aeronautics and biomedical engineering.
BUS 499, Business Strategy & Policy
Dave Quirk
L204
10 AM – Noon
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Tomás Carradero, Jessica Garner, Ben Olive & Lauren Oliver

Capsim Team Digby
Our mission is to provide a Broad Cost Leader strategy that keeps a strong presence in both high- and low-tech segments. We will strive to keep a competitive advantage over our competition by providing superior products. We attempt to keep our costs at a minimum based on the market. Our ability to keep products in both high- and low-tech will allow us to stay relevant in both segments. Higher-priced products for the industry offer solid value. Our stakeholders are bondholders, customers, stockholders and management. Our automation levels will be high, to keep productions costs low. After we establish our cost leadership position, we will reevaluate our strategy as a whole.
BUS 499, Business Strategy & Policy
Dave Quirk
L204
10 AM – Noon
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Angela Cusano

The Effect of Ministry Events on Perceived Self-Esteem
This project explores whether or not curated women’s ministry events have a positive effect on the attendees of the event. One main component of exploring this topic was the coordination and execution of the ministry event. For the event, I hosted an IF:Local on Northwest Christian University’s campus. This event was aimed toward women of all ages and consisted of simulcasted teachings, live worship, and a free lunch for all attendees. The event lasted from 9am to 3pm and allowed the women to come and go throughout the day. Though no legitimate study was performed to obtain statistically significant results, a survey was administered to all the attendees and collected in order to track any increase or decrease in the attendees’ reported self-esteem. The attendees were asked to take Rosenberg’s Self-Esteem Scale (1965) as they arrived and again as they left. This allowed for a change in reported self-esteem to be measured. The self-esteem of the attendees increased by 2.25 points. This represents that the event was a moderate success. Accordingly, It is possible that attendees may be positively affected by attending a curated ministry event.
COMM 499, Capstone
Doyle Srader
P003
1:30 – 2 PM
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Levi Dean

CRISPR
The discovery of DNA and its role in carrying genetic information was discovered in 1953. However, until recently scientists did not know that it could be altered. The development of CRISPR technology allows scientists to edit DNA sequences to alter how a gene functions. This discovery could lead to correcting hereditary diseases, which could potentially eradicate certain diseases indefinitely.
My capstone will describe how CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) works at the molecular level as well as its genome editing ability. I will start by introducing CRISPR, how it works, and how it has developed. From here I will introduce CRISPR’s genome editing abilities and its impact on the medical field such as correcting hereditary diseases. Furthermore, I have observed CRISPR’s effect on Zebra fish genomes in the Miller lab at the University of Oregon and I will share my experience from that. Since CRISPR technology allows scientists to edit DNA sequences to change or correct gene functionality, therefore changing an already developed person, some have found it to be unethical. I will end by discussing the potential ethical issues that CRISPR may have on society.
BIOL 499, Capstone
Paul Allee
P114
2 – 2:30 PM
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Malcolm Fleming

Diversity in Children’s Literature
This presentation focuses on diversity in children’s literature, which is critical because all children need to see themselves reflected in the literature they read. This literature also helps children appreciate individual differences. Researchers found that a majority of children’s literature in school libraries did not reflect racial, religious, SES, gender, disabilities, or sexual identity diversity. Researchers concluded that representations of children from diverse populations in literature must be characterized in ways that are realistic and engaging. For this study I examined current diversity in children’s literature to assess the range of diversity reflected. I went to three higher education libraries; Lane Community College, Northwest Christian University, and the University of Oregon. I examined their children’s literature collections in the following diversity categories; disability, LGBTQ, family/SES, and gender. I also examined racial diversity in each of the previous categories. I examined and evaluated 44 children’s books that ranged from pre-k to high school reading levels. I found that LCC had the most current collection of children’s literature in the four diversity categories. Fourteen of the 44 books addressed family and SES (e.g., divorce, domestic abuse, refugees, immigrant status, incarcerated parents, poverty, foster care). In the disability category the books primarily addressed physical disabilities. In summary, this presentation will stress the importance of exposing children of diverse populations, as well as societally mainstreamed children, to literature that will strengthen their awareness of themselves and others.
PSY 499, Capstone
Mary Ann Winter-Messiers
SPS 101
4 – 4:30 PM
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Elizabeth Gregory

Shared Personality Traits Among Mothers of Children with Autism
Mothers of children with autism may share personality traits and hold related behaviors in common. This presentation will review an exploratory study, the purpose of which was to investigate the intersection of mothers of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and potential personality commonalities and experiences. The researcher conducted a qualitative study, including interviews related to personality traits. Participants were five mothers of children with diverse autism diagnoses, 35 to 61 years of age with children ranging in age from early childhood to young adulthood. Further, the researcher administered the Big Five Personality Inventory, interviews in two individual sessions, an assessment based on mothers’ quotations, and demographic questions. The researcher found strong relations among mothers of children with autism and their similar emergent traits and behaviors becoming more identifiable as their children with autism aged. These traits are seemingly adaptive to the intensive needs and situations that accompany raising children with autism. Comparable identified, developed traits and experiences in the mothers included conscientiousness, agreeableness, gratitude, research and self-education, and social isolation. Based on the findings, the researcher emphasized the critical need for institutional and governmental support, community-wide acceptance and assistance, and overall societal compassion, understanding, and provision of aid for mothers of children with autism.
PSY 499, Capstone
Mary Ann Winter-Messiers
SPS 101
1:30 – 2:30 PM
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Katie Hastings & Emily Shinkle

Classroom Arrangements
For this research project, we explored the impact of seating arrangements on classroom management. For the purposes of this presentation, we looked into proximity, student behavior and engagement, and the different types of seating arrangements. The proximity of the teacher to the students determined the successfulness of both the behavior of the students and the seating arrangements. From our experiences in the classroom, we have observed the benefits and down falls to various seating arrangements. To conclude, we will address the effectiveness of room arrangements according to different subjects.
EDUC 321, Classroom Relations and Management
Brian Kaelin
L203
10 AM – Noon
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Molly Holmberg

My Semester in Music City
During my time in Nashville, I threw myself into the music industry doing graphic design, photography and videography for some of the top artists in country music. It was through those experiences I learned how to work with industry officials, tight deadlines, communication skills, making connections, and how to work from the ground up all while building up my reputation and portfolio. It was those skills and more that I learned going to a place where I knew no one and truly finding my passion. I have taken those skills and a new outlook and brought it back to NCU and the education program, determined to grow alongside others around me for the benefit of the generation that will be coming up through our schools here in Eugene.
GLST 295, Study Abroad
Lauren Riley
P114
10:30 – 11 AM
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Shahaley Holzgang & Bri Reay

What Research Says About Behavior Charts
Research says that using behavior charts in the classroom can be incredibly harmful to a student’s self-efficacy. Any good that can be accomplished (self-regulation skills, motivation, management) can be accomplished using other methods.
EDUC 321, Classroom Relations and Management
Brian Kaelin
L203
10 AM – Noon
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Amarachi Irechukwu

BioNutrition
Nutrition and genetics play a huge role when it comes to weight loss and weight gain. Both of these two things together can help to create a more personalized diet for a patient. Nutrition is a huge reason why some people gain and lose weight faster than others. It is the caloric consumption that can help us determine if we will store the remaining energy after our body uses it for cellular functions. Also it helps us determine if you are not getting enough energy for cellular functions causing you to starve yourself. A well balance diet can promote healthy weight loss and help with maintaining weight. If we can figure out what a person’s body has the easiest time to digest/ break down we can truly understand how their body reacts to different foods. Giving us an opportunity to develop a diet plan for them. Another thing to consider is that genes play a role in weight loss. Genes has the ability to give us information about someone predetermine health issues, their body weight composition, your ability to lose or gain weight and so much more. We will look at how a genetic component can help us to create a better diet. Or even to see if genes do not matter when it comes to dieting. In the realm of biology we are also going to go further in-depth and explore the microbial community in your gut and how it plays an important role in digestions and breaking down certain foods. This is a big thing to consider because without the bacteria in your gut you would have a hard time breaking foods down into energy. This community is essential for digestions. Furthermore, I want to create an understanding on why market diets don’t work and how I can create a more personalize diet plan to promote health weight loss.
BIOL 499, Capstone
Paul Allee
P114
2:30 – 3 PM
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Maya Jenkins & Katy Noel

Persuasion and Course Evaluations
A great deal of research has been conducted regarding the reasons that students are likely to complete quality course evaluations. However, little research has been done to analyze what persuasive strategies would produce the most participation and best quality course evaluations on a small campus like Northwest Christian University (NCU). Based on prior research regarding strategies used to promote participation in course evaluations, we propose a persuasive strategy for NCU with three conditions: classroom settings, broadcast, and one-on-one conditions.
Keywords: persuasion, course evaluations, NCU
COMM 450, Persuasion
Doyle Srader
P003
2:30 – 3 PM
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Madison Jones

Rotator cuff stresses in baseball and softball and why there should be pitch counts in both
The purpose this literature review is to demonstrate that softball and baseball pitching place a very similar amount of stress on the rotator cuff. The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles that help hold together the shoulder joint and provide the athlete the stability as well as the mobility necessary to perform the pitching motion. Resisting glenohumeral distraction is one of the biggest stresses seen within both pitching motions – this means that the muscles within the shoulder, especially the rotator cuff, are not allowing separation or pulling apart of the glenohumeral joint (shoulder joint). The repetitiveness of each pitching motion creates overuse injuries within the rotator cuff. In this literature review, it was concluded that the main cause of stress within the softball as well as the baseball pitching motions is the resistance of the glenohumeral distraction, and that the stresses within both sports are indeed similar. Therefore, softball should have pitch count regulations just as baseball does – and it seems like a major oversight to implement rules to protect athletes in baseball but have no such rules for softball players.
EXSC 425, Biomechanics of Musculoskeletal Injury
Heike McNeil
P103
1:30 – 2 PM
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Taylorann Matz

Homeless Adolescents and Faith
This project seeks inform listeners on how faith contributes to the development in homeless adolescents through a general overview of sources. Homeless adolescents need to have a sense of belonging to a group, a sense of hope, a sense of being loved, and a sense of purpose. This project looks at a biblical approach to addressing these needs with in a shelter environment.
Keywords: homeless, adolescents, faith, development
CM 499, Capstone
Agametochukwu D. Iheanyi-Igwe
P103
11 – 11:30 AM
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Emily Moon

Importance of Physical Therapy for Cerebral Palsy Patients
Cerebral Palsy is the most common disability in childhood. It is caused by damage to the brain and affects more than 17 million people worldwide. The effects of cerebral palsy include joint deformities and changes in muscle tone and muscular development. This eventually causes lifelong gait problems. In the past, invasive surgery has been the most common treatment for patients with cerebral palsy. In this literature review, new research is presented that shows success using physical therapy. Gait stability treatment through physical therapy has been found to help patients as it allows them to live a relatively normal life. In this presentation, the importance of physical therapy for patients with cerebral palsy through flexibility, mobility, and strengthening exercises as well as new virtual techniques that are being implemented into the treatment, will be discussed.
EXSC 425, Biomechanics of Musculoskeletal Injury
Heike McNeil
P103
2 – 2:30 PM
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Gabrielle Morales

‘Uncertainty was attached to everything he knew’: The Intergenerational Transmission of Functional Illiteracy
When the U.S. federal 2020 fiscal year budget was announced in March of 2019, the notice of an 11.4% cut in k-12 programs generated an uproar among educators, journalists, and news broadcasters (U.S. Department of Education, 2019, p. 119). Yet, little attention was given with respect for the 24.3% cut in Adult Basic and Literacy Education, as well as an identical 24.3% cut in English (Speakers of another Language) Literacy and Civics Education—of which equal a combined decrease of 48.6% in adult literacy programs (U.S. Department of Education, 2019, p. 120). Little effort has been made for the functionally illiterate parent. President Bill Clinton’s efforts to, “end welfare as we know it,” in 1996 sought to decrease the number of families on welfare rather than decrease the number of families living in deep poverty. With this reform came stringent welfare eligibility requirements and uncompromising General Educational Development assessments (GED) within Adult Basic Education programs (ABE). Meanwhile, within the past three years, there have been zero cutbacks in Career and Technical Education or Vocational and Adult Education grants—thus confining impoverished and illiterate citizens to careers within the manufacturing industry; such programs offer diminutive literacy education. Historically, welfare and adult education reforms have denied opportunities for low-literate and functionally illiterate adults. In thwarting one’s ability to read and write, the intergenerational transmission of functional illiteracy remains. To be clear, this thesis does not serve as a claim against the alleged ‘brokenness’ of the K-12 education system or welfare system. Rather, it serves to take part in the current body of literature—of which asserts the need for improvement within the adult education system.
Keywords: intergenerational functional illiteracy, united states, adult education
ENG 499, Capstone
Jenee Cazares & James Watson
P114
10-10:30 AM
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Luiz Muñoz

Elementary School Students At-Risk for Academic Failure
For decades, children in the US school system who are at-risk, have been neglected and avoided by teachers and administrators, exposing them to the likelihood of academic failure. In elementary school, children at-risk show signs of academic struggle when their grades fall below the class average. These children may be less likely to demonstrate academic success in school than their peers who are not at-risk. Thus, this presentation reviews four research trends in children at-risk for academic failure in elementary school. First, children at-risk may experience academic failure due to reading difficulties. Next, they may experience academic failure due to low math skills. Furthermore, children who are at-risk for academic failure may come from low SES homes. Finally, children at-risk for academic failure may reside in foster care. These common factors are four of many that may cause a child to be at-risk in academic progress. Researchers reported that if students at-risk do not have early help with their reading, they will fail academically. Due to their lack of curricular understanding in reading and math, children also expressed heightened anxiety and/or anger while being subjected to classroom testing. Moreover, children from low SES families or residential foster care who changed schools three to four times over a five-year period demonstrated higher cognitive dysregulation, which negatively affected their academic capabilities. Future directions for research will be discussed, including the need to conduct longitudinal studies that evaluate participants’ academic progress throughout future grade levels.
PSY 499, Capstone
Mary Ann Winter-Messiers
SPS 101
2:30 – 3 PM
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Morgan Newton

Why we should have classroom jobs in the third grade?
My research question is “Why should we have classroom jobs in Third-Grade?” My main points as to why will be to teach students responsibility, it builds a sense of community, so as a teach you don’t “bop ‘til you drop,” you should never do something for your students that they are capable of doing themselves. Also, Erikson’s stages of development: Industry vs. Inferior which students at this age want a sense of industry. Children start to have a sense of pride and accomplishment for their work. I will then discuss a few examples of how to go about classroom jobs including applications, rotating students and my own personal experiences.
EDUC 321, Classroom Relations and Management
Brian Kaelin
L203
10 AM – Noon
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Katy Noel

Discipleship and Communication
Though research has been done studying the relationship between Christianity and communication, the focus has been primarily on conversion and less on discipleship. Discipleship in this context can be understood as a mentor/mentee relationship between a mature Christian and a developing Christian. I have interviewed people who have been discipled to see what communicative themes would arise as effective/ineffective pertaining to their discipleship experience. Preliminary findings show that consistency, mutual self-disclosure, effective use of technology, ability to initiate hard conversations, and time spent together are common communicative themes present in a fruitful discipleship relationship.
COMM 499, Capstone
Doyle Srader
P003
2 – 2:30 PM
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Jordan Norris

Do religious people have destiny beliefs in their relationships?
Implicit theories of relationships play an important role in determining the outcome of a relationship. There are two main beliefs people hold, destiny or growth. Destiny beliefs were defined as evaluating a potential partner on compatibility. Growth beliefs were defined as cultivated over time and viewing disagreements as a way to grow the relationship. The Santa Clara strength of religious faith measures the participants strength of religious faith. In the present study, participants are surveyed on their relational beliefs and their strength of religious faith. Based on the literature, the hypothesis is the participants who have strong religious faith will believe in more destiny beliefs in their relationships. The participants were surveyed on their strength of religious faith and their implicit theories of relationships. The results did not support the hypothesis as there was a weak correlation among both beliefs and religious faith. Research limitations and future research are discussed, including the need for more diverse ways to reach participants to best represent the population.
COMM 499, Capstone
Doyle Srader
P003
10:30 – 11 AM
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Jordan Norris

The Impact of Religious Belief on Domestic Violence
Women of faith around the world have long been oppressed by their intimate partners due to manipulation of biblical texts. This epidemic transcends culture, countries, and religion. Women of faith, however, may become more resilient after experiencing domestic violence. Thus, this presentation reviews four research trends of the interplay between religion and domestic violence. First, the exposure of men to domestic violence in childhood may predict their engaging in domestic violence in their own marriages. Next, women of faith may withstand domestic violence because of biblical gender roles enforced by their husbands. Moreover, women of faith may remain in situations of domestic violence due to being economically dependent on their husband. Finally, additional training and education may be needed in order to counsel victims who experienced domestic violence. These elements of domestic violence among women of faith may be perpetrated by the language and culture of religious institutions endorsing female submission. These institutions may have supported this because many clergy felt ill-equipped in handling situations of domestic violence, leading them to avoid confronting male perpetrators of domestic violence in their faith communities. Future directions for research will be discussed, including the need to explore domestic violence in other countries and other religions, e.g., Hinduism, Buddhism, and Mormonism, in order to gain a more accurate picture of the ways in which domestic violence transcends religions.
PSY 499, Capstone
Mary Ann Winter-Messiers
SPS 101
3 – 3:30 PM
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Kayla Olson & Carly Sand

What are incentives and how can teachers use them in the classroom?
Our presentation is about incentives and how they are used by teachers in the classroom. We talk about the definition of an incentive, some benefits, and some examples. We are aspiring educators in the elementary and the secondary side so we focus on examples for both of those levels. Our examples leak over into both sides of elementary and secondary levels and we will explain how to use them in both sides. Our research came from multiple sources like our textbooks we used in our classes and other outside sources. Our focus is on what incentives are and examples on how to use them. Naturally, benefits will come in when we explain how to use them in each level of teaching.
EDUC 321, Classroom Relations and Management
Brian Kaelin
L203
10 AM – Noon
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Gianna Rains

Use of Communication for Training Youth in Leadership
Leadership training could not be completed without the knowledge of communication. I have researched the different communication skills and tools used in training youth in leadership positions. Like adults, youths also benefit from being trained for leadership roles like team captains, government teams, and ministry positions. Communication skills are essential to all of these positions. Therefore, communication skills such as interpersonal, conflict-management, sensemaking, and framing are all useful in training youth in leadership. Now taking this a step further, I have also discussed the way the Bible challenges or extends this understanding of how to teach leadership. Secular leadership can sometimes be seen through a completely different lens than the Bible teaches.
COMM 499, Capstone
Doyle Srader
P003
11 – 11:30 AM
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Tracey Raywinkle

The Impact of Cyberbullying on Adolescents
Adolescents today not only have to deal with traditional bullying but may also face cyberbullying. Adolescents and young adults who are the object of cyberbullying and involuntary isolation are more likely to engage in self-harm and suicidality than their non-bullied peers. Thus, this presentation will review four evidence-based factors of cyberbullying and the harm that it can bring upon vulnerable adolescents. First, the presentation will consider the evolution of bullying from traditional forms through today’s modern technology, or cyberbullying. Next, the presentation will review the impact of cyberbullying on adolescents in other countries. In addition, the presentation will examine the lack of relational and emotional support which may lead to cyberbullying. Finally, the presentation will highlight gender differences associated with cyberbullying. Researchers found that substance use and violent behavior may explain why both physical bullying and cyberbullying increased suicidal behavior in adolescents. Researchers also observed that both direct and relational victimization at school were positively associated with suicidal ideation, while relational victimization was more strongly associated with completed suicide. Researchers found that boys who experienced cyber-victimization were protected by schools, whereas, girls who experienced face-to-face victimization were more protected by parents. Lastly, experiencing cyberbullying not only resulted in girls having more negative attitudes toward school, but toward learning as well. Future directions for research will be discussed, including the need to gather more data from schools in other states and countries to increase the specificity of data, and the awareness of cyberbullying in other cultures.
PSY 499, Capstone
Mary Ann Winter-Messiers
SPS 101
3:30 – 4 PM
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Melissa Rios

The Effect of the Co-activation of the Hamstrings and Quadriceps on the Anterior Cruciate Ligament
Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury is one of the most common serious injuries to the knee. Mechanisms of ACL noncontact tears are still inconclusive from an epidemiological standpoint but have been associated with noncontact rotatory forces associated with planting, cutting, and landing in a valgus position, with a hyperextension mechanism, and finally by a violent contraction of the quadriceps, which pulls the tibia forward and tears the ACL. The purpose of this presentation is to investigate the effect of the co-activation of the hamstrings and quadriceps on vulnerability of the ACL. Both of these muscle groups contribute significantly to the integrity of the ACL. This work was done as part of a literature review; research clearly indicates that co-contraction of the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles will significantly decrease the in-situ forces and strain rates induced on the ACL. If the co-activation of these two muscle groups do indeed decrease the strain experienced in the ACL, preventative as well as rehabilitative programs for the ACL should at the very least include hamstring strength exercises.
EXSC 425, Biomechanics of Musculoskeletal Injury
Heike McNeil
P103
2:30 – 3 PM
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Jessica Sacker

How Can Teachers Best Support Students With ADD or ADHD in the Classroom?
To best answer the question, “How Can Teachers Best Support Students With ADD or ADHD in the Classroom?,” one must first define Attention Deficit Disorder as well as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Characterized by developmentally inappropriate and pervasive levels of hyperactivity, inattention and impulsivity, Attention Deficit Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder were present in 6.1 million children in the year 2016 according to a study conducted by the Center of Disease Control and Prevention.
ADD and ADHD is a common disorder that presents behavioral and social challenges for students as well as the academic challenges. Primarily, the aforementioned behavioral challenges consist of attention based issues as students who struggle to maintain focus as well as students who are hyperactive have difficulty self-managing. This concludes with inappropriate responses to social situations as well as noncompliance, aggression, and a lack of organizational skills.
The academic challenges tend to result from behavioral challenges if not from the disorder itself. Students with ADD or ADHD are more likely to have poor grades and lower scores on standardized tests. Their absenteeism rate is higher. They are also more likely to be expelled, suspended, or repeat a grade.
To counteract these challenges and support the students, teachers can conduct particular practices within the classroom. Teachers can implement behavior intervention such as modifying the environment to reduce distractions or providing fidget tools. Teachers can modify academic instruction to support the students’ attention needs. They can also establish a home and school communication program to better track behavior between school and support.
Conclusively, while students with Attention Deficit Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder may struggle with multitudinous challenges inside and outside of the classroom, there are actions that can be taken by the teacher to best support the student and create an atmosphere for said students to thrive and achieve their personal best.
EDUC 321, Classroom Relations and Management
Brian Kaelin
L203
10 AM – Noon
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Jonathan Sprouse

Social Media and the Church
This presentation will assess the use of social media by churches with the studies and knowledge of social media addiction. Several studies have been conducted on the use of social media and its effect on public health, however little has been done to study if the Christian Church should knowingly utilize these tools if they are addicting. This presentation will assess what social media is along with its benefits and downfalls. Additionally the presentation will address the downfalls of social media with what the scriptures of the Bible tell how we should respond. It is hoped that this presentation will inform church workers on how to use the tools of social media properly with the understanding of the Word.
CM 499, Capstone
Agametochukwu D. Iheanyi-Igwe
P103
11:30 – Noon
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